The Act establishes the world’s first comprehensive regulatory framework for AI, and is expected to shape the future of AI regulation and governance both within and beyond the EU.

By Elisabetta Righini, Hanno F. Kaiser, Tim Wybitul, Fiona M. Maclean, and Michael H. Rubin

After three years of legislative debate, the Council of the European Union cast its final vote on the European Union (EU) Artificial Intelligence (AI) Act on 21 May 2024. Once published in

Understanding the ICO’s approach to assessing financial penalties should be a key element of an organisation’s data protection strategy and risk profile.

By James Lloyd and Sami Qureshi

In an era when data protection infringements can tarnish business reputations overnight, understanding the financial ramifications is more crucial than ever. The UK’s Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) recently unveiled its much-anticipated updated guidance on the calculation of fines for data protection infringements under the UK General Data Protection Regulation (UK GDPR) and

The proposed amendments are expansive and would significantly affect how companies comply with the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act.

By Jennifer C. Archie, Marissa R. Boynton, Michael H. Rubin, Gabriela Aroca Montaner, Samantha M. Laufer, and Molly Whitman

Key Points:

  • The proposed amendments, which clarify or expand many of the COPPA Rule’s existing provisions, would be the first updates to the Rule in over a decade and would formalize recent FTC guidance and enforcement in

The amended rules follow the Biden Administration’s “whole of government” approach to maximizing notifications to executive agencies of cybersecurity events.

By Jennifer C. Archie, Matthew A. Brill, Gabriela Aroca Montaner, Chad Kenney, and Molly Whitman

On December 21, 2023, a divided Federal Communications Commission (FCC or the Commission) released a Report and Order updating its data breach reporting rules for certain telecommunications providers. The updated rules require that providers of telecommunications services, interconnected Voice over Internet

Covered financial institutions now face heightened expectations in relation to cybersecurity governance, risk assessment, and incident reporting.

By Jenny Cieplak, Tony Kim, Arthur Long, Clayton Northouse, Serrin Turner, Yvette D. Valdez, Deric Behar, and Molly Whitman

The New York State Department of Financial Services’ (DFS) amendments (the Amendments) to its cybersecurity regulations, which were adopted last month with the first implementation deadline of December 1, 2023, impose new and enhanced requirements on covered entities.

On November 1, 2023, the DFS announced the Amendments to its regulations that were initially published in 2017 (23 NYCRR part 500). The changes impose more demanding requirements for larger entities, new obligations to report ransomware incidents and payments, and expanded oversight responsibilities for board and senior management. Requirements related to business continuity and disaster recovery have also been included for the first time.

The new general data privacy laws in Oregon and Delaware expand on existing requirements under other state privacy laws.*

By Robert Blamires, Clayton Northouse, Austin L. Anderson, and Jennifer Howes

Key Takeaways:

  • On July 20, 2023, Oregon’s governor signed the Oregon Consumer Privacy Act into law. The law will take effect on July 1, 2024.
  • On September 11, 2023, Delaware’s governor signed the Delaware Personal Data Privacy Act into law. The law will take effect on January 1, 2025.
  • The Oregon law expands individuals’ right of access to their data to now include a list of names of the third parties to which a business has disclosed an individual’s personal data.[i]
  • Unlike most of the other new state general data privacy laws (and several other existing data privacy regimes), both laws apply to nonprofit entities, with some limited exceptions. Oregon gives nonprofit entities a one-year grace period beyond the law’s effective date.
  • Delaware requires covered businesses to obtain consent of individuals between the ages of 13 and 18 prior to processing their personal data for purposes of selling, targeted advertising, or certain profiling activities.

Washington State’s landmark privacy law has inspired other states to pass similar laws with stringent requirements on a broad range of companies and processing activities.

By Heather B. Deixler, Clayton Northouse, Austin L. Anderson, Kiara E. Vaughn, and Kathryn Parsons-Reponte

Key Takeaways:

  • On April 27, 2023, Washington State enacted the My Health My Data law (My Health My Data Act), a health privacy law that broadly applies to personal information that is or can be linked to a consumer and identifies the consumer’s physical or mental health status.
  • On June 16, 2023, Nevada passed a similar law by enacting Senate Bill 370 (Nevada Health Privacy Law).
  • Both laws apply to consumer health information not covered under health data privacy laws like the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, as amended (HIPAA). However, while Nevada’s law shares similar terminology as Washington State’s law, it is narrower in scope and unlike the Washington State law, it does not include a private cause of action.
  • The requirements under both laws include publishing a consumer health data privacy policy, obtaining consent for the collection and sharing of consumers’ health data with prescriptive requirements, and establishing consumer health data rights.
  • While both laws will be enforced by the states Attorney General, the Washington State law also provides a private right of action, allowing individuals to directly bring an enforcement action against a business.
  • With certain exceptions (see small businesses and the geolocation restriction under My Health My Data), both laws will go into effect on March 31, 2024.

Washington State and Nevada have now passed health data privacy laws that impose obligations relating to the collection, processing, and sharing of “consumer health data.” Both laws (collectively, State Health Data Privacy Laws) go into effect on March 31, 2024, with some exceptions. The Washington State law’s ban on geofencing went into effect on July 23, 2023, and the law also includes a slight delay for small businesses, which are not subject to most of the law’s requirements until June 30, 2024.

Covered companies will need to take additional steps to comply with the law in light of the new obligations relating to consumer health data and minors under 18 years old.

By Marissa R. Boynton, Serrin Turner, Joseph C. Hansen, Jennifer Howes, and Dyllan Brown-Bramble

On June 6, 2023, the Connecticut legislature passed Substitute Senate Bill No. 3 (SB3), which significantly amends the Connecticut Data Privacy Act (CTDPA), thereby broadening its reach. While the CTDPA took effect on July 1, 2023, the amendments do not yet apply.

The provisions in SB3 concerning consumer health data were originally drafted to take effect on July 1, 2023, alongside the rest of the CTDPA. However, a day after SB3 passed, the state budget bill amended the provisions related to consumer health data. The provisions will now take effect on October 1, 2023.

Separately, the requirements for dating app operators will take effect on January 1, 2024; the requirements for social media platforms will take effect on July 1, 2024; and the requirements for online providers of services, products, or features used by minors under 18 will take effect on October 1, 2024.

Florida’s law introduces novel provisions that depart from existing US state privacy laws, which businesses will need to carefully consider.

By Jennifer C. Archie, Clayton Northouse, Joseph C. Hansen, and Austin L. Anderson

Key Takeaways:

  • On June 7, 2023, Florida’s governor signed the Digital Bill of Rights into law, set to go into effect on July 1, 2024.
  • Unique to Florida, the law mainly targets very large enterprises, adopting a revenue threshold of at least $1 billion gross annual revenue for many of its requirements, and regulating companies engaged in specific enumerated digital lines of business.
  • The law also imposes obligations on all for-profit businesses (regardless of revenue threshold) that do business in the state and “sell” the sensitive personal data of Florida consumers.
  • Many of the law’s requirements are modeled off of Virginia’s privacy law, but covered businesses will need to pay special attention to unique requirements around consumer rights, privacy policy disclosures, and restrictions on data obtained from consumers under the age of 18.
  • The Florida Attorney General has exclusive enforcement authority, and penalties can reach up to $150,000 for certain violations, including failure to correct or delete a consumer’s personal data.
  • Favorably, the law provides a discretionary 45-day right to cure.

A California court has held that the regulations the California Privacy Protection Agency adopted in March 2023 may not be enforced until March 2024.

By Michael Rubin, Joseph Hansen, Austin Anderson, and Max Mazzelli

On June 30, 2023, a day before the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) as amended by the California Consumer Privacy Act (CPRA), and the accompanying regulations issued by the California Privacy Protection Agency (Agency), were set to come into force, the Superior Court of California granted a petition to restore a key aspect of the voter-enacted law: covered businesses must receive a one-year grace period between final adoption and enforcement of the CCPA regulations. Certain forthcoming regulations will also receive a one-year grace period.