Following in the wake of the FTC’s report on online tracking, the Commerce Department has issued its “green paper” on privacy. The report is part of the Department’s ongoing review of privacy practices begun in April this year. While it avoids making many specific policy recommendations, the report does recommend the development of Fair Information Privacy Principles, creation of a privacy office within the Department, and consideration of a national data security breach notification law. The themes are

In a long anticipated report entitled Protecting Consumer Privacy in an Era of Rapid Change, a divided U.S. Federal Trade Commission focused on raising consumer awareness and soliciting industry feedback on online tracking and behavioral advertising. Industry is portrayed as “too slow” to improve privacy practices in this arena. The report proposes a normative framework for how companies should protect consumer privacy, which is designed to serve “as a policy vehicle for approaching privacy.”

While the report solicits industry

In December 2010, the European Parliament will vote on a Report of Philippe Juvin (EPP, FR) on behavioural advertisement. The Report passed the Internal Market Committee on 8 November 2010 and raises concern over “the routine use of behavioural advertising and the development of intrusive advertising practices”. Juvin suggests to introduce an obligation to mark advertising based on behavioural data and to provide links with further information about the underlying techniques. The criticism expressed by the Report is in line