The new framework provides an additional route for personal data transfers from the EEA to the US.

By Robert Blamires, Gail E. Crawford, James Lloyd, Clayton Northouse, Alice Brunning, Alexander Ford-Cox, and Jennifer Howes

On 10 July 2023, the European Commission (EC) took the final step to enable businesses to start relying on the new EU-US Data Privacy Framework (DPF) for transfers of data from the European Economic Area (EEA) to the US. The EC adopted an adequacy decision following the fulfilment by the US of its implementation commitments under the DPF. The adequacy decision enables organisations to transfer personal data from the EEA to organisations in the US that have self-certified under the DPF with immediate effect. As of 10 July 2023, organisations that were certified under the EU-US Privacy Shield (Privacy Shield) are now certified under the DPF and can begin receiving data from the EEA via the DPF.

The California Attorney General’s investigative sweep is a potential harbinger of increased focus on employers’ data privacy compliance with respect to employee data.

By Robert Blamires, Michael H. Rubin, Joseph C. Hansen, and Kathryn Parsons-Reponte

On July 14, 2023, the California Attorney General announced an investigative sweep targeting large California employers, focusing on employers’ compliance with the California Consumer Privacy Act’s (CCPA’s) recently expanded coverage of employees and job candidates. The announcement follows the expiration of a prior exemption for personnel and business to business (B2B) data under the CCPA (for more information, see this Latham blog post).

The stringent law introduces several novel obligations and a unique approach to determining applicability that may broaden its reach.

By Clayton Northouse, Michael H. Rubin, and Robert Brown

On June 18, 2023, Texas enacted the Texas Data Privacy & Security Act (TDPSA), which will largely take effect in just over a year on July 1, 2024. The TDPSA follows in the footsteps of 10 other comprehensive US state privacy laws but sits decisively on the more stringent end of the spectrum.

While the TDPSA is generally modeled after the Virginia Consumer Data Protection Act (VCDPA), it adopts many of the more consumer-friendly components of more recently enacted laws. It also introduces several novel obligations and a unique approach to determining applicability that may broaden its reach.

In light of these factors and considering the size of the Texas economy and population, the TDPSA may prove to be the most impactful state privacy law since the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA), which was enacted in 2020.

The FTC and many state attorneys general aggressively monitor apps, websites, and internet-connected products for COPPA compliance.

By Jennifer C. Archie, Michael H. Rubin, and Alexander L. Stout

In the United States, collecting data directly from children under 13 years of age is tightly regulated by a federal statute, which is aggressively monitored and enforced. Under the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA), even seemingly straightforward online data collection and storage practices such as logging an IP address or storing an email address are subject to strict requirements, such as providing notice and obtaining advanced parental consent prior to collection or storage.

Under COPPA, obtaining proper consent can be technically or administratively burdensome, expectations shift with technological advancement, regulatory exceptions are vague, and penalties are calculated on a per-violation basis. COPPA is enforced by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and state attorneys general, both of which are very active in this area. Although the FTC maintains a website with answers to frequently asked questions, the law is complicated, and companies should consult with an attorney.